De Boer RVS
De Boer RVS
De Boer RVS
De Boer RVS

De Boer RVS invests in new premises

De Boer RVS

MAKKUM – De Boer RVS had new premises built on its site near the harbour. The old workshop was demolished and, after temporarily working from leased space elsewhere, the company moved into its new premises at the start of the summer. There will be a party to celebrate the opening in the autumn.

With a floor area of 45 by 30 metres, the new premises are three times larger than the old warehouse. Yet all of the extra space is already being put to use. The team is busy building shrimp processing lines, partly thanks to the ongoing possibility of substantial government grants for investments that add value on deck.

The shrimp processing line for the HK 83 Zuiderzee stern trawler was built on a single frame. Plug & Play, says Melle de Boer.

In recent weeks, De Boer RVS has supplied several vessels with shrimp cookers and/or sorting drums, including the HK 83, HK 84, ZK 37 and GRE 3, as well as the PEL 2 (via the German dealer Klein in the Büsum-Husum region). And new stainless steel hoppers are ready for shipment to the WR 15 shrimp trawler and the WD 3, Ireland’s first new beam trawler. The LUYT shipyard is one of the company’s main clients. Its first in-house laser cutting machine was installed in mid-July. De Boer RVS also works flat out for the agricultural industry.

The shrimp processing line for the HK 83 Zuiderzee stern trawler is remarkable for several reasons. The whole line sits on one frame. The owner of the vessel, Jan Foppen, wanted to be able to quickly remove and replace the shrimp line so he can also fish on the IJsselmeer. Another novel feature is the inclusion of an additional heat exchanger, which uses the heat from the exhaust to preheat the water in the shrimp cooker to 80 degrees. This reduces diesel consumption. De Boer RVS also built a special mini-set for the aluminium fishing vessel HK 84 ‘Vischpoort’: a shrimp washing machine with a stacked double drum.

New hoppers for shrimp trawler WR 15.

For years, director Melle de Boer (48) and his colleagues have been working to further improve sustainability in the shrimp fishing industry. Returning unwanted bycatch to the water alive as quickly as possible eliminates the need for a sorting drum. Five years ago, a detection sorting system was field tested for the first time on the GRE 5. The same system was subsequently installed on the new WR 289. However, this created a bottleneck down the line because the sorting system could not cope with the volume of shrimp being delivered.

Shrimp cooker for German vessel and grading drum for Zoutkamp vessel.

Having worked quietly in the background for years, occasionally running tests on the WR 9, De Boer hopes a breakthrough is imminent. “Sievage is eliminated. Each shrimp is instantly measured by a camera. The detection sorting system could initially only process up to a few hundred kilos of shrimp. But soon we will be able to process up to five thousand kilos per hour and will have to buffer for the shrimp cooker. The faster processing also means that unwanted bycatch is back swimming in the sea in no time. There is also the additional option of ejecting all inorganic objects such as pieces of plastic. You won’t have to wait long. It’s on the way!”

Planning engineer Clemens Oud in the company’s lovely new canteen.

In the new premises, De Boer leases office space to FD Engineering. FD stands for business partners Tjeerd Folkertsma and Remko Dijkstra, who provide services such as technical drawing and engineering for De Boer RVS.

Next year, De Boer’s twin sons will join him in the business. Melle is looking forward to it.

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